Auston Grove Apartments

1160 Auston Grove Drive, Raleigh, NC 27610
Call: 866-220-3907 Email UsAustonGrove001@myLTSMail.com View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$800-$1250

Apartments Raleigh NC Blog

4 Reasons to Rent - Raleigh, NC

4 Reasons to Rent - Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 13, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCBuying a home is part of the American Dream, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the best choice for you.

For decades, the conventional wisdom has been that buying a house makes much better financial sense than renting one. After all, you'll have to spend a large chunk of your income on housing either way, so doesn't it make more sense to invest that money in something you'll eventually own, rather than simply forking cash over to someone else?

However, a number of factors can make renting a much wiser financial decision than buying. Here are four good reasons why it may be smarter for you to rent instead of buy.

1. You're not staying in the home very long

The sooner you intend to move, the less sense it makes to buy.

If you plan to stay put for less than two years, then buying a house would be a poor investment. In such a sort amount of time, the home likely wouldn't gain enough value to make up for the costs of buying and selling it, like realtor commissions, closing fees, moving expenses, and so on. And don't forget that buying or selling a house is a huge hassle compared to switching from one rental to another.

2. You're in an inflated housing market

Some parts of the country are prohibitively expensive to live in. Coming up with a down payment for a $500,000 house is considerably harder than coming up with a down payment for a $150,000 house. But what makes certain highly desirable urban areas really problematic is that home prices in these areas can be driven steeply upward by the high demand. Not only would you have to pay an inflated price for the house, which makes it harder for you to turn around and sell it for a gain in a few years, but you'd also have to pay far more each month as a homeowner than you would as a renter for the same amount of house.

3. Your income isn't secure

If you're not confident in your job security, then now is not the time to make a huge purchase like a new house.

If you suddenly lose a major source of income, then you may need to cut your housing costs in order to get by. That's a relatively quick and painless process if you're renting; you might pay a fee to end your lease early, but you could move to a cheaper home in a matter of days. If you own your home, then a career crisis could force you to sell your house at a bad time; it may take months to find a buyer, or you might end up selling the house for less than you paid for it.

4. You have no savings

If an emergency savings account is important for a renter, it's absolutely crucial for a homeowner. As a renter, if something goes wrong with the house, you can simply call the landlord, who will have to pay to fix the problem. As a homeowner, all the expense lands squarely on your shoulders. Even if nothing expensive breaks down on you, homeowners have ongoing additional costs such as homeowner's insurance and property taxes.

If you don't budget for such expenses or run short one month, you may end up having to tap into savings to pay for them. And if you don't have a well-funded savings account, you may be forced to turn to credit cards -- and that repair bill will be made even more expensive by interest and possibly fees.

Also don't forget that ponying up a down payment will take a big bite out of your savings. You'll need to make sure you still have a solid emergency fund after you've paid out the down payment and the cost of moving. After all, what's the point of buying home if you'll be too busy fretting about expenses to enjoy it?

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

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The Motley Fool


It is Cheaper to Rent than Own in Raleigh, NC

It is Cheaper to Rent than Own in Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, April 04, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCOwning a home is often considered the American dream — and it’s an expensive one. Homeowners in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., pay from 33% to 93% more for housing each month than do renters living in the same state, according to a new NerdWallet analysis.

But many homeowners reap benefits that you can’t get from renting. The equity you build can be leveraged for loans that can be used to improve the home and boost its value or be used in financial emergencies.

While renting can’t offer thosefinancial benefits, it’s cheaper to rent on a month-to-month basis. If you’re wondering how to save money for a down payment, renting can help you build that nest egg — but in extremely expensive or competitive markets, renting might be better for the long haul.

To determine the monthly homeownership premium — the additional cost of owning instead of renting, expressed as a percentage — NerdWallet compared 2015 American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau for the median gross rent and median homeownership cost in each state and Washington, D.C. Median gross rent includes the costs of monthly rent and utilities for all kinds of rental properties, and median homeownership cost includes monthly mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance and utilities. This comparison doesn’t include the down payment required to buy a home, which is traditionally 20% of the home price for conventional mortgages, but is lower for FHA or VA loans.

Key takeaways

  • Owning is more expensive everywhere. Across all 50 states and Washington, D.C., it costs more each month to own a home than to rent. The median cost people pay nationwide to own a home is 54% more than the median cost to rent each month.
  • The smallest difference is still a third more to own.
  • In some states, the cost of owning far eclipses renting.

State: North Carolina
Homeownership Premium: 49%
Median Monthly Cost to Own: $1234
Median Monthly Cost to Rent: $827
Difference: $407

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

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NerdWallet


Apartment Hunting Tips, Avoid a Scam - Raleigh, NC

Apartment Hunting Tips, Avoid a Scam - Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCApartment hunting in Raleigh, NC can be tough. The area’s growing population and demand is no match for limited housing stock. With the presence of Craigslist and other sites online, apartment hunting can be even more challenging, since there are so many scams and fake listings. Here are four tips to help you avoid being scammed and find a new apartment successfully.

If you are asked to give money before even seeing the apartment.

This is not a common practice and usually is a sign that something fishy is going on. You should never pay for something you don’t see in person. Also, don’t rely on pictures. They may be digitally edited to look better or completely fake.

You don’t need a lease.

Always, always make sure you sign a lease. Legally, you don’t need a lease but it is common practice. If the landlord doesn’t want to sign a lease, sign a month-to-month agreement. If you don’t sign a lease and pay money, you could be putting yourself in a bad situation.

You never meet anyone to see the property.

If someone asks for rent money to show you an apartment, then always cannot make an appointment, run for the hills. Anyone in the real estate industry who is professional will meet you in person before renting a property.

You need to give personal information through

Never disclose your social security number via email. That is not the professional way of doing business. You should not have to give personal information until you have met with the landlord and seen the apartment. You will need to disclose your personal information for a credit check but there usually is an official form for that.

Overall, trust your gut. If something seems off or not right, it probably isn’t. It’s better to be safe than sorry. For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove.

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sampan.org


In Raleigh, NC You Can Live Like Royalty for Less Than 70K

In Raleigh, NC You Can Live Like Royalty for Less Than 70K

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Auston Grove, Richmond, VAMaking a good living is one thing, living well is another. And that often boils down to where you choose to live.

The best places are likely the ones where you can find a job, earn a good salary and buy a nice home. In a 2016 report, job-hunting site Glassdoor calculated the top spots where your pay will go furthest, based on salaries and home values. To do so, the jobs site came up with a cost of living ratio — a city's median base salary divided by its median home value.

Noticeably missing are some of America's biggest cities. While you can certainly earn more in hubs like New York and San Francisco, few people can afford to buy a house or an apartment there.

We came up with the top 25 places where an average paycheck goes a very long way and the quality of life is great. (A higher ratio number is better.)

25. Raleigh, NC

Cost of living ratio: 30%
Median base salary: $62,000
Number of open jobs: 22,339

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

To see the whole article, click here.

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CNBC


Best Places to Live in America – Raleigh, NC

Best Places to Live in America – Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 13, 2017

Auston Grove, Apartments in Raleigh, NCWhen deciding where to put down roots, many factors are in the eye of the beholder, such as climate, politics, or proximity to extended family. Other aspects are coveted by nearly everybody: affordable housing, access to well-paying jobs, a low cost of living, good schools, and quality healthcare. In its recently released ranking of the best places to live in America, U.S. News & World Report gathered data on these crucial components for the 100 most populous US cities.

They then categorized the data into five indexes for each city — job market, value, quality of life, desirability, and net migration — to definitively rank these major metro areas.

Scores for "value," a blend of annual household income and cost of living, and "quality of life," which accounts for crime, college readiness, commute, and other factors, are included below on a 10-point scale, as well as the city’s population and median annual salary.

4. Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina

Population: 1,714,629
Median annual salary: $47,430
Quality of life: 7.4
Overall value: 6.9

Raleigh-Durham and Chapel Hill are collectively known as the Triangle, an area anchored by its foundation in research and tech. The Triangle employs nearly 40,000 residents at companies like IBM, SAS Institute Inc., and Cisco Systems as well as surrounding colleges Duke, North Carolina State, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A strong job market coupled with a burgeoning microbrewery and dining scene draws 80 new residents every day, said a local expert

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

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businessinsider.com


North Carolina is High on the LIst for Best States for Business

North Carolina is High on the LIst for Best States for Business

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCWe score all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Our study is not an opinion survey. We rely on tangible numbers to gauge each state's performance, scoring all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, using publicly available data.

Here are our categories and this year's weightings.

Workforce - We rate states based on the education level of their workforce, the numbers of available employees, and the states' demonstrated abilities to retain college-educated workers. We measure workforce productivity based on each state's economic output per job. We look at the relative success of each state's worker training programs in placing their participants in jobs. We also consider union membership and the states' right-to-work laws.

Cost of Doing Business - We look at the competitiveness of each state's tax climate, as well as state-sponsored incentives that can lower the cost of doing business. Utility costs can add up to a huge expense for business, and they vary widely by state. We also consider the cost of wages, as well as rental costs for office and industrial space.

Infrastructure - We measure the vitality of each state's transportation system by the value of goods shipped by air, waterways, roads and rail. We look at the availability of air travel in each state, the quality of the roads and bridges, and the time it takes to commute to work.

Economy - We look at economic growth, job creation, consumer spending, and the health of the residential real estate market. We measure each state's fiscal health by looking at its credit ratings and outlook, as well as its overall budget picture. We also consider the number of major corporations headquartered in each state.

Quality of Life - We score the states on livability, including several factors, such as the crime rate; inclusiveness, such as antidiscrimination protections; the quality of health care; the level of health insurance coverage and the overall health of the population. We evaluate local attractions, parks and recreation, as well as environmental quality.

Technology & Innovation - We evaluate the states on their support for innovation, the number of patents issued to their residents and the record of high-tech business formation. We also consider federal health, science and agricultural research grants to the states.

Education - Higher-education institutions offer companies a source to recruit new talent, as well as a partner in research and development. We consider the number of higher-education institutions in each state, as well as long-term funding trends for higher education. We look at several measures of K–12 education, including test scores, class size and spending. We also look digital and lifelong learning opportunities in each state.

Business Friendliness - But we grade the states on the freedom their legal and regulatory frameworks provide for business.

Cost of Living- The cost of living helps drive the cost of doing business. From housing to food and energy, wages go further when the cost of living is low.

Access to Capital - We look at venture capital investments by state, as well as small-business lending on a relative basis.

North Carolina is #5 on the list of America's Top States for Business.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove.

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cnbc.com


Renting Your First Apartment in Raleigh, NC

Renting Your First Apartment in Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Auston Grove Apartments, Raleigh, NCWhen you are moving out on your own, your first home will probably be an apartment. They are generally inexpensive, available, smaller, and are often concentrated in the places where young people most like to live.

Starting the process may seem nerve-wracking at first, especially if you do not know what to expect. A little bit of planning and preparation can go a long way in helping you get into the best apartment for your needs.

Setting a budget

The rule of thumb is that your rent should be no more than 30 percent of your income, ideally more like 20 to 25 percent. Perhaps more important than the percentage is whether you will have enough money left over after paying your rent to cover your other obligations. Consider your costs for transportation, food, insurance, debt payments, and other necessities and calculate how much you can afford to spend on an apartment.

Additional costs of renting

As you are looking for apartments within your budget, remember some additional costs that may or may not be included in the rent. The big one is utilities, including electricity, heat, water, and cable. If your rent does not cover these, you may be able to call the utility company with the apartment address to get an estimate of what the recent bill amounts have been for that unit.

Consider other added costs like a garage or parking space and fees for having a pet in your apartment. On the flip side though, make sure also to factor in perks, like a fitness center and pool, which may allow you to skip paying for a separate gym membership.

Signing a lease

You'll need to go through several steps before you sign a lease. The application will include an employment check, calling your personal references, and checking your credit history. If you do not have good credit history or solid employment, the landlord may require you to have a guarantor or co-signer on the lease with you. Your parents are the best candidates for this role.

When you sign a lease, be ready to put down some money. This will include a security deposit, the first month's rent, and sometimes the last month's rent as well. Find out what you need to do to get your security deposit back in full when you move out.

The last major thing to consider is the length of the lease. You are committing to live there for the entire lease term, and it is worth finding out what the penalties are for breaking the lease if you need to move. Some apartments will let you sublet to another tenant to finish out your lease, which can be helpful if you are not confident you'll stay at your current job.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove Apartments.

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1st Source Bank


Should Active Military Members Rent or Own? - Raleigh, NC

Should Active Military Members Rent or Own? - Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Auston Grove Apartments in Raleigh, NCDeciding when to take the home-buying plunge can be tough. For military members and their families, the unique nature of their service often adds a new layer of consideration.

Here are a few key things to consider.

1. Frequent relocation

Active-duty military personnel move frequently, often once every two to three years. Prospective buyers should be comfortable with the idea of turning around and reselling a property or renting it out—and the possibility of neither of those coming to pass.

Talk with real estate agents and other experts to get a feel for the local housing market and near-term trends. You might have no problem selling the home or finding renters in your particular community, but there are no guarantees.

Even if your Permanent Change of Station (PCS) moves you across the country, you’re still on the hook for that new mortgage payment. Short sales and foreclosures can wreck your credit and put home buying out of reach for years. So it’s not a decision to take lightly.

2. Costs of renting vs. buying

Do your homework, and get a clear sense of what’s likely to cost more. Paying a mortgage is may be cheaper than renting in some U.S. markets, but every buyer’s situation is different. A good lender can help you get pre-approved and run realistic affordability numbers.

Keep in mind homeownership comes with costs that renters don’t typically face, like maintenance, lawn care, appliance repairs, and more. And buying with $0 down means you’ll start life as a homeowner with little to no equity.

3. Wants and needs

Homeownership offers a lot of freedom, but it also comes with significant responsibility. Take stock of your priorities to see where you land. How important is it for you to personalize your space? Do you enjoy home and yard maintenance? How do you feel about paying for them?

Owning a home means you can’t call the landlord to fix a broken pipe or replace the water heater. Renting means you’re building equity for someone else.

In the end, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer. Buying a home evokes thoughts of long-term stability that are sometimes at odds with the unpredictability of the military lifestyle.

Still, there’s something to be said for the sense of pride and independence that come along with homeownership. Think long and hard about what’s right for you, and get good information from real estate and mortgage experts you trust.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove.

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Realtors.com


Moving to Raleigh? Things to Know

Moving to Raleigh? Things to Know

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCCommunity - A Great Reason to Move to Raleigh

One of the best parts about Raleigh is that it's a city with a small town feel. Raleigh is a city where people know your face and that's all they need to know. It's often you will run into someone you met, recognize their face and embrace in a warm greeting without even knowing one another's names. There is a feeling of comfortability and familiarity in Raleigh that comes from that small town feel. You may not recognize it at first, give it six months though and you'll know exactly what we are talking about.

Raleigh is a city, and it's a small town, at the same time. It's large enough so that you're always meeting new people, and small enough so that you're constantly running into the ones you know!

Raleigh is the Best Place for Jobs

If you're moving to Raleigh you will have a much easier time finding a job than you will anywhere else. Glassdoor has ranked the city of Raleigh, NC as the #1 Best City for Jobs!

With more than 24,000 job openings there is sure to be one for you. Additionally, Raleigh has a job satisfaction rating of 3.3 Raleigh, NC is on the top end when it comes to being happy in the work-place.

The Research Triangle Park (RTP) is a huge part of what makes Raleigh such a great place for jobs. A lot of executives will move to Raleigh to begin working in RTP with so many larger businesses that have their office headquarters there. You can learn more about RTP and the companies that are there by clicking this link. Outside of the park you will find companies like MetLife who just moved to Cary, NC and set up their technology office with six-figure salaries. Go to Downtown Raleigh and you will see other companies like RedHat and Citrix who have set their headquarters there. 

Education is Some of Best in Nation

Raleigh is ranked as the second most educated city in America by Forbes, and it's neighbor Durham is third. With universities like North Carolina State University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina all within a short distance of Raleigh it only makes sense that the area places a high priority on quality of education.

Weather in Raleigh is a Reason to Move!

The weather in Raleigh is perfect and a great reason to relocate. Raleigh celebrates all four seasons (yes, it snows here!) and is only a couple hours from the Mountains if you enjoy skiing or snowboarding.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

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raleighrealtyhomes.com


What's it like to live in Raleigh, NC?

What's it like to live in Raleigh, NC?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 07, 2017

Auston Grove apartments, Raleigh, NCRaleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill are known for their research/technology roots and collegiate rivalries. This tri-city region (known as the Triangle) is luring nearly 80 new residents a day with strong job growth and a high quality of life.

Many people who call the Raleigh and Durham metro areas home are young, friendly, diverse and educated. They enjoy dining out in local restaurants – many of which have earned national accolades – and gathering over craft beers in one of the region's many microbreweries. A strong sense of community is evident, as strangers are quick to provide a friendly conversation when standing in line at the supermarket.

Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill also encompass beautiful green spaces, family-friendly museums and a growing art and music scene defined by monthly gallery walks, summer concerts and music festivals like Hopscotch.

Rankings

U.S. News analyzed 100 metro areas in the United States to find the best places to live based on quality of life and the job market in each metro area, as well as the value of living there and people's desire to live there. Raleigh & Durham ranks as #7 with an overall score of 7.2 out of 10.

Raleigh & Durham, NC  - #7 in Best Places to Live

  • 7.2 Overall Score
  • 6.9 Quality of Life
  • 7.7 Value

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove.

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US News



Auston Grove Apartments

1160 Auston Grove Drive, Raleigh, NC 27610

Call: 866-220-3907
Email UsAustonGrove001@myLTSMail.com
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$800-$1250