Auston Grove Apartments

1160 Auston Grove Drive, Raleigh, NC 27610
Call: 866-220-3907 Email UsAustonGrove.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$800-$1250

Apartments Raleigh NC Blog

North Carolina: Retire like a Vanderbilt for Less

North Carolina: Retire like a Vanderbilt for Less

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCBack in 1895, the breathtaking Blue Ridge Mountains, a comfortable climate and low land prices inspired the Vanderbilts to buy up 125,000 acres of North Carolina wilderness and build the Biltmore House, the largest estate in the U.S. The same factors that attracted this wealthy family continue to make North Carolina popular among retirees and second-home buyers today.

But the Tar Heel State offers a little bit of everything, geographically and culturally. Retirees who prefer to live by the sea can find 300 miles of barrier island beaches, two national seashores and idyllic villages in the state’s eastern region.

North Carolina also has some great college towns, including Chapel Hill, Davidson, and Durham. And dynamic city living can be found in fast-growing Charlotte, which has been undergoing a restaurant renaissance, and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill-Cary vicinity, dubbed the “Research Triangle” due to its high density of high tech companies.

For anyone on a fixed budget, living costs in North Carolina can be fairly friendly. Overall, the state is 3.7% cheaper than the national average. State income taxes are also to 5.8% flat tax.

For more information on retiring in apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove.

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Should You Rent or Own in Retirement? Probably Rent

Should You Rent or Own in Retirement? Probably Rent

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, August 10, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCThere are lots of good reasons to own a home, both as a working adult and as a retiree.

But despite these perks, a growing number of older Americans are choosing to forgo homeownership in favor of renting instead. A recent study by Credit Sesame found that 33% of baby boomers and 46% of seniors 65 and over are making a conscious decision to rent, even though they can afford the latter option. It therefore raises the question: Is homeownership later in life such a good idea after all?

Renting in retirement has its benefits

The motivation to rent in retirement when you can otherwise afford to buy typically boils down to one thing: locking in your costs. Most retirees live off a fixed income, so it stands to reason that the more fixed costs they're able to work with, the better. And while many retirement expenses come with their fair share of variables, there's perhaps no more volatile a budget-buster than owned property.

While it's true that your mortgage payment can't go up in retirement (assuming, of course, that you have a fixed loan, and not a variable one), that's just one piece of the homeownership puzzle -- and it's your peripheral costs that are likely to climb. Take property taxes, which, in some parts of the country, can equal or even exceed one's mortgage payment itself. Even during periods when home values drop, property taxes still have a tendency to rise. In 2000, U.S. homeowners paid an estimated $247 billion in real estate taxes, but by 2010, that figure climbed $476 billion. Of course, the housing market had by no means recovered by 2010, but that didn't matter -- homeowners were still on the hook for higher taxes.

Then there's maintenance to consider. The average homeowner spends anywhere from 1% to 4% of his or her home's value on annual upkeep. Now if you happen to buy a new home in retirement, you can probably keep your maintenance costs to the lower end of that range. But if you're hanging onto a house you've been living in for years, chances are you'll be facing the higher end. For a $400,000 property, that's $16,000 a year on maintenance alone.

Regular upkeep aside, when you own a home, there's always the possibility of a major appliance going bad, or a significant repair popping up when you least expect it. If you're on a tight budget, which many retirees are, and you're suddenly forced to shell out $10,000 to replace a faulty roof, the financial impact could be downright catastrophic.

That's why in many cases, you're better off renting in retirement than owning. Yes, you will have to accept the fact that your rent will probably go up year after year, but if you sign a multi-year lease, you can mitigate this risk. And if your rent does go up to the point where you no longer feel it's affordable, there's always the option to pick up and move. Will that be easy? No. But it's an option nonetheless -- whereas ignoring a capsizing roof is not.

Again, there are benefits to owning a home in retirement that make it a viable option as well. On top of the aforementioned tax breaks, your home can serve as a source of equity, whether via a loan or a reverse mortgage . But if your savings are limited and you're worried about money, renting a home may be the better choice for your senior years. This way, you'll get a roof over your head, without the financial obligation to be the one to fix it.

For more information on renting an apartment in Raleigh, NC during retirement, contact Auston Grove.

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foxbusiness.com


Retire to This Great Small City: Raleigh, NC

Retire to This Great Small City: Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Auston Grove, Raleigh, NCDoes the thought of retiring to a sleepy beach town or country hamlet bore you silly? Spending your post-work years in a city has plenty of perks, including easy access to the arts, cutting-edge health care, and a diverse set of neighbors. That said, the cons of urban living (like cost) can be daunting. There is a happy medium. We set out to find places that won’t ding your nest egg with high taxes and nosebleed prices, yet still have great attractions and plenty of your peers. Read on for five affordable small cities (populations of 150,000 to 500,000) you may one day want to call home.

Raleigh, North Carolina

  • Population: 431,700
  • Population 62 and over: 11.3%
  • Median home price: $210,000
  • Cost of living index: 92.3

TAXES

Like all the states in this story, North ­Carolina does not tax Social Security benefits. The state has no inheritance or estate tax.

  • Income tax: 5.8% flat
  • Sales tax: 6.75% (combined state and local)
  • Median property tax: $1,800

WHY IT STANDS OUT

This state capital’s thriving economy and proximity to top universities have long made it a prime relocation destination. And ­recently more of those new ­faces have had a few wrinkles: from 2000 to 2010 the city’s population of 55- to 64-year-olds shot up by 97%, according to the Brookings Institution. It’s not hard to see the draw: Raleigh provides a big-city feel with a low cost of living; mild, four-season weather; and, thanks to all those medical schools, world-class health care.

WHAT TO DO

  • Food: The city has a diverse restaurant scene, with everything from Afghan cuisine to Southern barbecue.
  • Music: The 5,000-seat Red Hat Amphitheater hosts the big acts, while the opera and symphony perform at the Duke Energy ­Center for the Performing Arts. Art: A range of work is on display in galleries, public spaces, and parks. Or take in the 30 Rodin sculptures at the North Carolina Museum of Art.
  • Education: North Carolina State University’s lifelong-learning program offers affordable courses and study trips on topics including American poetry, digital photography skills and Civil War history.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove.

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Auston Grove Apartments

1160 Auston Grove Drive, Raleigh, NC 27610

Call: 866-220-3907
Email UsAustonGrove.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$800-$1250