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Auston Grove Apartments
1160 Auston Grove Drive

Raleigh, NC 27610 leasingoffice@austongroveliving.com

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Apartment Hunting in Raleigh, NC? Consider Resident Reviews

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Are you looking for an apartment in Raleigh, NC?  There is a great advantage to living in a reputable, well-run and well-maintained apartment community. It is very important that you are not ignored by your landlord, and that you can be certain that your needs and requests will be addressed. At Auston Grove Apartments, we would like to share with you a survey and comments from a resident upon their recent service request at our apartment home community:

Was your service request completed within 24 hours?
Yes
Was the repair or replacement completed to your satisfaction?
Yes
Did the Service Team leave your apartment in good, clean condition?
Yes
Was a Service Survey Card left in your apartment?
Yes

Comments:

Maintenance has always been done promptly and correctly. I love Auston Grove and that is why I've lived here for over 10 years.

If You Are Looking for an Apartment in Raleigh, NC Consider Resident Reviews

Joseph Coupal - Monday, July 21, 2014

Are you looking for an apartment in Raleigh, NC?  There is a great advantage to living in a reputable, well-run and well-maintained apartment community. It is very important that you are not ignored by your landlord, and that you can be certain that your needs and requests will be addressed. At Auston Grove Apartments, we would like to share with you a survey and comments from a resident upon their recent move out of our apartment home community:

Ease of move-out process
Very Satisfied

Professionalism with which you were treated during move-out process
Very Satisfied

Likelihood that you would return if circumstances changed
Very Satisfied

Overall experience while residing at community
Very Satisfied

Would you recommend us to a friend?
Yes

Comments:
I thoroughly enjoyed my stay at Auston Grove apartments. It was a rewarding experience. Your staff is very friendly, courteous and professional; ready to help in any way they can and giving a lot of information as to how one can maneuver their way around Raleigh, get to the shops, entertainment centers, e.t.c. The premises are kept very clean and fresh. I would love to come back and stay longer given the chance!

Looking for an Apartment in Raleigh, NC? Count on Resident Reviews

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Are you looking for an apartment in Raleigh, NC?  There is a great advantage to living in a reputable, well-run and well-maintained apartment community. It is very important that you are not ignored by your landlord, and that you can be certain that your needs and requests will be addressed. At Auston Grove Apartments, we would like to share with you a survey and comments from a resident regarding their recent service request for an apartment in our community:

Was your service request completed within 24 hours?
Yes

Was the repair or replacement completed to your satisfaction?
Yes

Did the Service Team leave your apartment in good, clean condition?
Yes

Was a Service Survey Card left in your apartment?
No

Comments
The service request was handled immediately. My health and welfare was the top consideration and I greatly appreciated the quick response. While I could have handled things for a while, thanks to the Auston Grove Team I was not subjected to any delay in the solution to the problem. HHH, we have the best staff at Auston Grove.

Buying A House Can Often Be A Terrible Investment – Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Too often, the media portrays owning your home as "The American Dream." There are a large number of advantages to renting over owning. In fact, historical evidence shows that money goes much further in stocks than it does in real estate.

Yale economist Robert Shiller, one of the world's most respected experts on the study of home values, analyzed home prices over the last century and discovered that home values only rise at about the same rate as inflation. This view is also shared by USC Economics Professor Robert Bridges.

Rather than sinking $100,000 into a house which only keeps up with inflation, it is far more productive to put $100,000 into an index fund which has historically risen at a faster rate than inflation even before including dividends.

He believes renting is far better alternative to owning.

Maintaining ownership of a house comes with a cost. Homeowners still have to pay "rent" in the form of:

  • Property Tax
  • Maintenance/Repairs
  • Insurance
  • Mortgage/Interest (if applicable)
  • Opportunity Cost (the amount invested in the house could have alternatively been producing gains in the stock market.)

That's big price to pay simply to maintain something you already own!

Buying a house in the first place also includes transaction costs (legal, real estate agent, title check, inspections, etc.) that often come to 7% to 10% of the cost of a house. So you are 7% to 10% down immediately. And then you pay another 7% to 10% when it comes the time to sell.

Besides the cost, there are other advantages renting has over owning:

  • Renting comes with a lot more convenience. It is the landlord's responsibility to make necessary repairs, keep the driveway plowed, and keep the lawn mowed.
  • Renting also makes you more mobile; it's easier to move quickly whether you find another job or have some other reason to move such as safety concerns, conflicts with neighbors, or changes in the neighborhood like construction.
  • Real Estate is illiquid. If you need to quickly access cash during an emergency, you won't be able to get that money out of your home in a timely fashion. A house that is for sale can stay on the market without getting any offers for a very long time. By contrast, stocks are very liquid, can be sold at any time, and even produce dividends which can be either distributed as income or reinvested for further gains.
  • Lack of diversification: Homeowners usually put a very large portion of their net worth plus debt into one asset. That's not just narrowing their investment to the housing market, it's narrowing their investment to one specific area of the housing market in one particular town and street.

To gain exposure to the housing market without losing liquidity and diversification, it may be better to look into a fund such as Vanguard REIT (VNQ) as an alternative to owning a physical house. However, it may be wise to stay clear of the housing sector altogether as we enter a period where interest rates have nowhere to go but up, and the Federal Reserve has announced intentions to raise interest rates next year. Rather than investing in real estate (whether it be in the form of REITs or in the form of physical housing), it may be far more productive and simple to invest in a standard broad-market index fund such as (VTI) or (SPY).

Conclusion:

One of the key investing principles should be simplicity. Buying a house creates complexity and headaches. This complexity is completely unnecessary and inconsistent with intelligent investing principles. Buying a home createsunnecessary complications, doesn't produce worthy returns on investment, and narrows your diversification. Renting is a much more efficient and effective alternative to home ownership. Due to these reasons, a house has no place in anyone's portfolio. It is never a good idea to buy a house outright, let alone borrow money for it.

For information on apartments in Raleigh, NC contact Auston Grove Apartments.

seekingalpha.com

What it Will Cost to Maintain a Home - Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Monday, June 30, 2014

If you're considering purchasing a home, be sure to take the annual maintenance and repair costs into account. Here's how to calculate them.

If you’re thinking about trading up to a bigger home, or moving from renter to homeowner, you’ve probably done a lot of math.

But one key figure is hard to project and is often overlooked: If you buy a home, how much will you shell out every year for maintenance and repairs? A careful look at these potential costs might discourage you from buying a more expensive property or might make renting look more appealing than it would seem otherwise.

There’s no way to forecast these costs for sure. But mortgage-data firm HSH Associates suggests that homeowners assume they will come to about 1% of the property’s value — every year.

That’s $3,000 on a $300,000 home. To be on the safe side, you should probably use that as a minimum. So let’s say $4,000, and assume you’d also need a healthy cash reserve for any big expense that homeowners insurance doesn’t cover, such as a new furnace or roof.

A $4,000 annual maintenance and repair budget is $333 per month. If you bought a $300,000 home with 20% down and a 30-year fixed-rate loan at 4.75%, your $240,000 mortgage would cost $1,252 a month, according to the BankingMyWay.com's Mortgage Loan Calculator.

A $333 monthly maintenance and repair budget would equal nearly 27% of your principal and interest payment. That stings!

Let’s look at it another way. Assume your home is an investment that will grow in value over time. Historically, home values have gone up about 4% a year, on average. Because of inflation, your maintenance costs will also continue going up, so they will always equal 1% of the home’s value. As a result, your home really gains just 3% a year. That happens to be the long-term inflation rate. So in real, inflation-adjusted terms, your home would not grow in value at all.

For still another way of looking at it, consider what economists call the “opportunity cost” of spending $333 a month on fix-ups. Suppose that instead of incurring these repair costs, you invested $333 a month in a mix of stock and bond mutual funds. You could have $57,282 after 10 years, $169,965 after 20 years and $391,630 after 30 years. That assumes a 7% annual return, about what most experts figure a mixed portfolio will average over long periods.

Granted, maintenance and repair expenses are unavoidable if you own a home, and if you rent they’re built into your rent, and your annual rent increases.

For more information on apartments in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove Apartments.

realestate.msn.com

Hot Temperatures and Your A/C - Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Monday, June 23, 2014

Your air-conditioner like yourself has to work harder in these temperatures to cool you. With temperatures being in the high 90’s or higher, there are a few items you may want to consider when setting the temperature on your thermostat in your apartment in Raleigh, NC. Also remember to notify the office as soon as you notice an issue with your system. Most issues don’t get better the longer the system runs.

A few things to consider while setting your thermostat:

  • Your A/C system can only cool to a certain point. Some systems may not be able to cool your home down to below 74 degrees.
  • Keep your blinds closed during the day to keep the sun and heat out.
  • Keep all of your windows closed and only open the door to enter or exit
  • Keep your A/C running while you are not home. Turning off the system while you are not home will cause the system to run for hours before cooling your home. This also puts added stress on the system and may make it fail prematurely.
  • Only raise the temperature 5-10 degrees while you are out. That way it will be comfortable when you return and won’t take as long to cool to your normal temperature.
  • The A/C systems of those residents on the top floor or on the afternoon sun side of the building will have to run more to cool their home.
  • Your A/C system will run longer in these temperatures. It is more difficult to cool your home in these temperatures.
  • Cooking adds extra heat to your home and will cause the A/C to run longer to remove the extra heat.
  • Take your long steamy showers in the morning or very late at night. It will be easier for the A/C system to remove the steam and extra heat while the outside temperatures are lower.
  • If the A/C is running warm area, go ahead and cut the system off.  The outside unit is probably frozen and will need to thaw before repairs can be made.

World Refugee Day and Festival in Raleigh

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Refugee organizations in North Carolina will hold a festival in downtown Raleigh on Friday to celebrate World Refugee Day. If you live in an apartment in Raleigh, NC, don't forget to stop by and celebrate.

World Refugee Day is held every year on June 20. It is a special day when the world takes time to recognize the resilience of forcibly displaced people throughout the world.

The event will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the 100 block of Fayetteville St., just south of the State Capitol, and will include dancing, crafts, children’s activities and community service agency information in honor of refugees around the world and in North Carolina.

The N.C. State Refugee Office, the U.S. Committee of Refugees and Immigrants of North Carolina, Lutheran Services Carolinas and African Services Coalition of North Carolina Music are hosting the event.

Free entertainment on stage with music and dance plus cultural exhibits all day from 10 am - 3 pm on Saturday in recognition of World Refugee Day. Raleigh will honor local refugees and their contributions to the community with live music, speakers and dance. Event also features displays about local refugees and their communities, along with demonstrations of traditional customs, clothing and handicrafts. The public is welcome.  Local groups will be providing entertainment throughout the day.

newsobserver.com
More information - visitraleigh.com

Buy vs. Rent: Common Myths Busted - Raleigh,NC

Joseph Coupal - Monday, June 09, 2014

When weighing major life decisions, everyone seems to have the answer. You should marry this person, drive that car, and have so many kids—all by a certain age. Never mind if it’s actually the best choice for you!

Home ownership is no different. Deciding whether to buy or rent always comes with a generous helping of opinion. So how do you separate fact from fiction?

Let’s start by breaking down three common myths.

Myth #1: Buying a home is the grown-up thing to do.

Many folks look at home ownership as a rite of passage into adulthood. According to the National Association of Realtors, the typical first-time home buyer is 31 years old. So if you’re 25 and feel like you’re behind the curve because you haven’t bought a home yet, stop worrying. There’s no reason to rush into a big purchase just because friends or family tell you it’s what you’re supposed to do. Real grown-ups know it’s not the money-smart choice in every situation.

During times of transition, renting for a year or two gives you time to get your feet on solid ground before making a life-changing decision. Here are a few examples:

  • You just graduated from college and aren’t ready to plant your roots in one place yet.
  • You moved to a new city and aren’t sure which neighborhood is right for you.
  • You’re in the military and don’t want to lose money on a home every time you’re stationed in a new place.

Dave also recommends waiting at least a year after getting married to buy a home. After all, it takes a year of being married to know how close to your mother-in-law to buy. Spend your first year getting to know each other and learning how to manage your money well as a team. You have until “death do you part” to take your next big plunge!

Myth #2: It’s stupid to pass up a good deal when the market is hot.

You found the perfect home, and the sellers are practically giving it away. It just might be the deal of the century. Even though Sallie Mae’s got her clutches on your pocketbook, you’d be dumb to walk away, right?

Wrong!

With real estate, you make money by buying the right thing at the right time—not by taking advantage of the market.Never buy a home based solely on the market. Buy when you’re financially ready. Here’s how you know you can afford it:

  • You’re out of debt.
  • You have 3–6 months of expenses in your emergency fund, plus enough cash for a 10–20% down payment on a 15-year fixed mortgage.
  • You’re paying cash up front, or your mortgage payment is no more than 25% of your monthly take-home pay.

Jumping into home ownership with debt and no emergency fund is like diving into a pool with no water. You’re sure to hit rock bottom. First the A/C breaks, then the roof leaks. Next thing you know, you’re turning to credit cards and loans to pay for it all—and the hole you’re in just keeps getting bigger.

There’s nothing wrong with renting while you work to get your finances in order. In fact, Dave encourages it! Take time to lay the right foundation before you take the leap, and your home will be a blessing instead of a curse.

For more information on renting an apartment in Raleigh, NC, contact Auston Grove Apartment Homes.

daveramsey.com

Triangle Restaurant Week in Raleigh is Here

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, June 03, 2014

If you live in an apartment in Raleigh, NC, then this is week to try all the great food that the Triangle has to offer. Triangle Restaurant Week, a week-long celebration of the premier Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill culinary scene, is returning for the second time this year. Beginning on Monday, June 2, TRW will continue through Sunday, June 8.

While some of the restaurants' menus are still being finalized and tweaked, you can take a look at the participating restaurants here, or visit the Triangle Restaurant Week website.

For a truly unique experience, check out "The Chef's Table," which became an option during TRW this past January. Select restaurants will offer a five-course menu paired with five wines for $50 to $100. Reservations for The Chef's Table are only available Monday through Thursday during TRW.

Triangle Restaurant Week is a week-long celebration of culinary excellence where participating restaurants offer special three-course menu options and fixed pricing, a great opportunity for residents and visitors alike to indulge in the area’s finest cuisine! No reservations, tickets or passes required.

Pricing for the event is $15 for a 3-course lunch, and $20 or $30 for a 3-course dinner. Price is for each person and does not include beverages, tax or gratuity.

Cost: $20 or $30 depending on venue

WRAL

More information - trirestaurantweek.com

Make Your Apartment Pet Friendly – Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 27, 2014

When deciding to adopt a pet, it requires a lot more than just bringing the little guy home from the shelter or breeder. With him comes a lot of stuff – not to mention precautions on your part to protect your own stuff from him, and vice versa. Before you take your new pet home to your apartment in Raleigh, NC, read on to find out what you need to buy, get rid of, or move out of reach of your new curious cat or canine.

Pet supplies: Before bringing your new pet home, you need to have food (and a bowl to put it in), somewhere for him to sleep, a collar and leash if it’s a dog, and maybe some treats and toys to help ease his transition into his new space. If you got a puppy that will need to be housebroken, a crate is a good idea to help prevent accidents in every corner of your apartment (not to mention a serious dent in your security deposit). Other necessities may include medicine, poop bags, a hair brush, shampoo and toothbrush.

Cleaning supplies: As cute as they are, pets can also be messy, especially a dog who needs to be walked in all types of weather, thereby bringing mud, ice and snow back inside with him. Stock up on carpet and floor cleaner for whatever he tracks in, as well as inevitable accidents and sickness. Another key factor is hair – consider investing in a heavy-duty pet vacuum if your new companion is a big shedder, and stock up on lint rollers for your clothes and furniture.

Pet proofing: Another thing to consider before bringing your pet home is what hazards he could get into. Anything that lives close to the floor – like trash cans, power cords, stuff crammed under the bed – could look like enticing chew toys to your dog or cat. Get as much off the floor as you can, especially potentially hazardous items like pills, cleaning supplies and electric cords. When you’re not home, be sure to close off any rooms you don’t want him in unsupervised. And if he learns how to open cupboards and trash cans, it’s time to get some locks to keep him – and your stuff – safe.

Training: Just as important as making your apartment suitable for your pet is making sure your pet respects your apartment. Sign up for obedience classes right away if you get a dog, and set limits for what’s OK and not OK at home. It may be cute the first time your dog grabs a sock out of the laundry basket, but your roommate won’t be happy if she comes home to a half-eaten shirt. Make your house rules – whether the pet is allowed on furniture, if he can eat table scraps, etc. – and stick to them to maintain a happy household.

renters.apartments.com


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